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Fujifilms latest Instax instant camera can add audio clips to your prints

first_img 0 Share your voice Post a comment Colorful and compacts. Sarah Tew/CNET The Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay combines the features of an analog instant film camera with digital camera convenience in the smallest package possible. Like the company’s Instax Square SQ10, the LiPlay (pronounced LEE-play) is a hybrid instant film camera. It doesn’t shoot straight to instant film like analog Instax cameras, but instead uses a very small 1/5-inch digital image sensor that captures 2,560×1,920-pixel images (about 5 megapixels). The prints are small like those from other Instax Mini cameras at 3.4 by 2.1 inches (86 by 54 mm), though the actual image size is 2.4 by 1.8 inches (62 by 46 mm).22-fujifilm-instax-mini-liplayThe LePlay’s LCD lets you review shots before you print. Sarah Tew/CNET At its heart, the LiPlay is a digital camera. To that end, you get a small LCD on the back to frame your shots, and all your pictures are stored to either internal memory or an optional microSD card. This means you can print just the shots you want, instead of getting a print every time you press the shutter release. And you can customize photos with one of the camera’s six color filters and one of up to 30 frame options before you print.Although a large portion of the digital camera market has disappeared due to the prevalence of excellent phone cameras, the instant film camera market continues to be popular. Since its introduction in 1998, Fujifilm has sold more than 40 million Instax models globally, according to the company. 17-fujifilm-instax-mini-liplayYou can turn up to 10 seconds of audio into a QR code to put on prints. Sarah Tew/CNET The LiPlay also has Bluetooth so you can connect it to your phone. Using the LiPlay mobile app, you can remotely control the camera, which makes selfies a bit easier (although the front does have a small selfie mirror). You can also use the LiPlay as a printer for any of the shots you take with your phone. Plus, with no ink or paper, the film is the only consumable. That, along with its compact size, makes the LiPlay very easy to travel with. The built-in battery is good for up to 100 prints on a single charge.Taking its digital features a step further than the SQ10, Fujifilm added a mic button to the front of the camera. Press it to record up to 10 seconds of audio that gets converted to a QR code and printed in the corner of the picture. Scan it with your phone and you’ll hear the clip.The Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay goes on sale June 14 for $160. Tags Computers Cameras Fujifilmlast_img read more

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Jatka conservation begins 24 Feb

first_imgJatka. file photoJatka Conservation Week-2018 will be observed across the country between 24 February and 2 March, aiming to create mass awareness on protecting Jatka (Hilsha fry) to boost the production of the national fish, reports UNB.Fisheries and livestock minister Narayan Chandra Chanda came up with the information at a press briefing at the secretariat on Thursday.”We have restored the proverb ‘Fish and rice make a Bengali’ as we are now self-sufficient in fish production after 46 years of our independence,” said the minister.He said the production of fish in the country in 2016-17 fiscal year was 4.13 million metric tonnes where the hilsa production was 12 per cent.The fisheries minister said the contribution of hilsa in the country’s GDP (Gross Domestic Product) is one per cent.Around 2.5 million people are involved directly and indirectly in hilsa production in the country, said Chanda.The minister said the hilsa fish has secured recognition as the geographical indication (GI) product of Bangladesh and now Bangladeshi hilsa will be presented in global market with its own identity.The fish-enriched Bangladesh will be presented as a country of hilsa and the government is now committed to protect and preserve hilsa, Narayan Chandra Chanda added.last_img read more

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2018 prediction Was reinforcement learning applied to many realworld situations

first_imgBack in 2017, we predicted that reinforcement learning would be an important subplot in the growth of artificial intelligence. After all, a machine learning agent that adapts and ‘learns’ according to environmental changes has all the makings of an incredibly powerful strain of artificial intelligence. Surely, then, the world was going to see new and more real-world uses for reinforcement learning. But did that really happen? You can bet it did. However, with all things intelligent subsumed into the sexy, catch-all term artificial intelligence, you might have missed where reinforcement learning was used. Let’s go all the way back to 2017 to begin. This was the year that marked a genesis in reinforcement learning. The biggest and most memorable event was perhaps when Google’s AlphaGo defeated the world’s best Go player. Ultimately, this victory could be attributed to reinforcement learning; AlphaGo ‘played’ against itself multiple times, each time becoming ‘better’ at the game, developing an algorithmic understanding of how it could best defeat an opponent. However, reinforcement learning went well beyond board games in 2018. Reinforcement learning in cancer treatment MIT researchers used reinforcement learning to improve brain cancer treatment. Essentially, the reinforcement learning system is trained on a set of data on established treatment regimes for patients, and then ‘learns’ to find the most effective strategy for administering cancer treatment drugs. The important point is that artificial intelligence here can help to find the right balance between administering and withholding the drugs. Reinforcement learning in self-driving cars In 2018, UK self-driving car startup Wayve trained a car to drive using its ‘imagination’. Real world data was collected offline to train the model, which was then used to observe and predict the ‘motion’ of items in a scene and drive on the road. Even though the data was collected in sunny conditions, the system can also drive in rainy situations adjusting itself to reflections from puddles etc. As the data is collected from the real world, there aren’t any major differences in simulation versus real application. UC Berkeley researchers also developed a deep reinforcement learning method to optimize SQL joins. The join ordering problem is formulated as a Markov Decision Process (MDP). A method called Q-learning is applied to solve the join-ordering MDP. The deep reinforcement learning optimizer called DQ offers out solutions that are close to an optimal solution across all cost models. It does so without any previous information about the index structures. Robot prosthetics OpenAI researchers created a robot hand called Dactyl in 2018. Dactyl has human-like dexterity for performing complex in hand manipulations, achieved through the use of reinforcement learning. Finally, it’s back to Go. Well, not just Go – chess, and a game called Shogi too. This time, Deepmind’s AlphaZero was the star. Whereas AlphaGo managed to master Go, AlphaZero mastered all three. This was significant as it indicates that reinforcement learning could help develop a more generalized intelligence than can currently be developed through artificial intelligence. This is an intelligence that is able to adapt to new contexts and situations – to almost literally understand the rules of very different games. But there was something else impressive about AlphaZero – it was only introduced to a set of basic rules for each game. Without any domain knowledge or examples, the newer program outperformed the current state-of-the-art programs in all three games with only a few hours of self-training. Reinforcement learning: making an impact irl These were just some of the applications of reinforcement learning to real-world situations to come out of 2018. We’re sure we’ll see more as 2019 develops – the only real question is just how extensive its impact will be. Read next This AI generated animation can dress like humans using deep reinforcement learning Deep reinforcement learning – trick or treat? DeepMind open sources TRFL, a new library of reinforcement learning building blockslast_img read more

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Competition Bureau clears WestJet and Deltas transborder joint venture

first_imgCompetition Bureau clears WestJet and Delta’s transborder joint venture CALGARY — WestJet and Delta Air Lines are one step closer to cementing a transborder joint venture that will expand their codesharing and expand their networks with more frequencies and destinations.The proposed venture has received clearance under Canada’s Competition Act from the Canadian Competition Bureau (CCB). The CCB issued a no-action letter confirming that it does not intend to challenge the agreement.“Today’s clearance by the CCB is an important step towards satisfying the conditions necessary to implement the proposed WestJet-Delta transborder joint venture,” said Ed Sims, WestJet President and CEO. “We thank the CCB for its timely and thorough review. The joint venture will lead to more consumer choice, connectivity, and economic benefits on both sides of the border by growing U.S.-Canada business and tourism travel.”The proposed joint venture between the two airlines is still subject to regulatory approval from the Department of Transportation in the United States.Upon receipt of all regulatory clearances, the venture will allow the two carriers to deepen their existing partnership with expanded codesharing, reciprocal elite frequent flyer benefits, optimized growth across the U.S.-Canada transborder networks, and co-location at key hubs.More news:  ‘Turn around year’ for TPI brings double-digit growthThe partners will also begin implementing joint sales and marketing activities. Tags: Delta Air Lines, WestJet Share Travelweek Group center_img Posted by << Previous PostNext Post >> Thursday, June 27, 2019 last_img read more

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